Melting snow.

The winter wonderland that was the village a few weeks before was fast becoming a mess as snow turned to slush. The seasons change rapidly in the north. The time difference between sunset on arrival to sunset at our departure a month later was two hours, three if you count the man-made daylight savings. The melting snow ran off the mountain in rapid steady streams; small dams built by local children overflowed and washed away within minutes. There was a […]

Continue Reading

Lockdown Polaroids 2.

Expired film and flashbacks under lockdown.

Continue Reading

Farewell to shipmates.

With a single wave from a heavily laden arm, and without looking back, my new found friend swiftly walked away. Aside from thinking he must have strong arms, I was a little surprised by his near indifference, I thought we had become good shipmates. I’ve always approached farewells with much trepidation. I find them to be highly charged emotional events as the minutes and then seconds tick down to zero hour; much like New Year’s Eve, and I hate New […]

Continue Reading

The Randfontein By Election of 1988.

My Big Break presented itself in the spring of 1988. I’m not sure if one gets a Big Break, it’s more a series of smaller ones that culminate into what looks like The Big One. But this seemed large at the time. I was sent by a daily newspaper to cover an election in a rural Afrikaans stronghold an hour or so west of Johannesburg. The journalist I was assigned with,┬ámet me outside the photography department’s main entrance in a […]

Continue Reading

Lockdown Polaroids 1.

Expired film and flashbacks under lockdown.

Continue Reading

Little Garden.

The little garden, a postage stamp oasis in the middle of the Karoo, where a group of well-dressed people were gathered around a small bench. My opening line, throwing in many flattering words as splendour and lush, worked perfectly and I was invited to step through the front gate to the garden. In a short while I had them pegged as good Christian folk, they said they were going to Laingsburg in the morning for an early church service. Ouma, […]

Continue Reading

Gdansk.

With two rods in the water, a Gdansk Shipyard worker settles in for a quiet Sunday afternoon. Rewind approximately 40 years, the Lenin Shipyards as they were known, was the birth place of Solidarnosc (Solidarity), the Polish non-governmental trade union co founded and led by the dockyard electrician, Lech Walesa. Solidarity was the beginning of the end for the Soviet Union and Lech Walesa went on to become the President of Poland (1990-1995) picking up a Nobel Peace price along […]

Continue Reading

Henry.

Henry was a press photographer in the ’80s. He insisted he knew my name back then and I insisted he didn’t. In the mid-’80’s I had taken my first steps into the photo world and was extremely low in the ranks; in army terms, a Private. So I’m almost certain that at the time there weren’t any bylines bearing my name for Henry to notice. I spent two days in his company at his home in Calvinia and wondered how […]

Continue Reading

Operation Braveheart.

As the house lights were dimmed, the body took on an otherworldly glow with the combination of the single overhead operating light and the iodine it had been sponged with. I was left to shuffle around in the dark, going deeper into my private space as I hid behind the camera. I knew I was about to witness something personally unimaginable. Operation Braveheart.

Continue Reading